Earnhardt Nation Book Review

by
Filed under: Dale Earnhardt Jr 



Earnhardt Nation: The Full-Throttle Saga of NASCAR’s First Family

Earnhardt Nation

Buy At Amazon

A vivid look into the lives of the first family of stock car racing, the Earnhardts and the rise of NASCAR. EARNHARDT NATON goes back more than sixty years to tell the stories of Ralph Earnhardt, son Dale and his son Dale Jr.

In the early days Ralph Earnhardt would spend his days hard at work at the cotton mill, his nights preparing his race car, and his weekends racing.

His son Dale and Grandson Dale Jr have become legends because of that work ethic and what went on inside that garage.

Earnhardt Nation is the story of the Earnhardt family and the Earnhardt Family business.

Earnhardt Nation isn’t just about Ralph, Dale and Junior, though, it’s about the entire Earnhardt clan. You get to know the Earnhardt family behind the scenes. From the beginning days of racing right up to the present day.

Jay Busbee brings us up close and personal to the Earnhardt’s.

It’s not just a sorry of the Earnhardt family though. Earnhardt Nation dives into the business side of the Earnhardt name and its selling power.

“Few people ever reach speeds of 200 mph, some families make a business out of it, and none has done it with more breathtaking abandon, writes Busbee.

The story begins with Ralph Earnhardt quitting his cotton mill job to make racing a full-time career. Creating a racing dynasty that is still charging ahead today.

About the author: Jay Busbee is a lead writer covering NASCAR for Yahoo Sports. He lives in Atlanta with his family.

Earnhardt Nation is available at Amazon

 

 

 

Comments

2 Comments on Earnhardt Nation Book Review

  1. Bernie O'Hara on
  2. NASCAR’s roots started in the South with some drivers hauling Moonshine and racing their Moonshine cars. In the deep South tradition many NASCAR tracks not only allowed the display of the Confederate flag they embraced it. That’s the girl NASCAR invited to it’s dance. Now with NASCAR loss of ticket sales and sponsor money they wish to divorce the girl who put NASCAR on the map.

    Comes now NASCAR says the Confederate flag is irrelevant and has banned it. Oh really. Then why did you embrace it for many, many years? Is it the same reason you embraced the fan base who brings and flies the Confederate flag? The very people who put NASCAR on the map? The very people who spends millions of dollars on the sponsors products? The very people who buys a ticket to pay the drivers and keep the track open? Yes, it was greed for thy self. And it’s this same greed that’s your motive to ban the flag now. Money comes before all things.

    A little history lesson to NASCAR and the folks who may have fallen asleep in your History class, if you took History at all. Read this real slow. The North won the Civil War and Robert E. Lee surrendered to Ulysses S. Grant at Appomattox Court House on April 9, 1865. At that moment the Confederate flag became null and void OR irrelevant. People who study laws need to explain that to people as many must have missed it.

    Two reasons the Confederate flag is relevant at all today. 1. People born in the South likes the flag and have a First Amendment right to display it. 2. People, like NASCAR and others, uses and abuses the Confederate Flag for their on greed, agenda, or narrative. NASCAR used the Confederate flag and the fans who fly it to make money.

    Now NASCAR is once again using the Confederate Flag to try and stay relevant.

    Odds are NASCAR has done more damage to the reputation of Southern people than any other entity for embracing the Confederate Flag.

    A little history lesson to NASCAR and the folks who may have fallen asleep in your History class, if you took History at all. Read this real slow. The North won the Civil War and Robert E. Lee surrendered to Ulysses S. Grant at Appomattox Court House on April 9, 1865. At that moment the Confederate flag became null and void OR irrelevant. People who study laws need to explain that to people as many must have missed it.

    Is NASCAR infringing on people’s rights? To my knowledge, there is no law saying you can’t wear a Confederate flag. I don’t believe fans sign a waiver when they purchase a ticket telling them what to wear. And displaying that flag should be part of a person’s 1st Amendment right surrounding freedom of speech, just like kneeling for the national anthem is at NFL games.

    Yeah. that’s what I was exploring for.. thanks. Dyna Herman Bria

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